The Ecorium at Naka Incineration Plant, Hiroshima
Japan Japan in Haiku Technology Travel

Japan in Haiku 22: Temple of Consumption

Temple of Consumption

Shiny temple burns
not incense but city waste.
Shrine to consumption.

At the end of Hiroshima’s main boulevard there’s a dazzling building that’s both technology museum and tourist attraction. And neither of these things. Curiously, this building is the city’s waste processing plant.

The Naka Waste Plant is a state of the art construction (the same architect designed New York’s MOMI) with a glass tunnel running through it that leads to the sea. From this tunnel, or ‘Ecorium’, people can watch their rubbish burn. Except there’s nothing as dirty as rubbish on view. It’s all squeaky clean (workers are rumoured to take their shoes off before going in) and silver lined.

The idea is that in an overpopulated city, with a growing problem of rubbish and how to dispose of it, if people could see the waste production for themselves, they might produce less waste. That’s the theory anyway.

About the author

Kirstie Pelling

Kirstie is the creative force and chief poet in residence of poetinmotion.org She is available for residencies, as a conference poet and wedding poet. She is also co-founder of The Family Adventure Project and a regular contributor to many online travel communities.

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About Author

Kirstie Pelling

Kirstie is the creative force and chief poet in residence of poetinmotion.org She is available for residencies, as a conference poet and wedding poet. She is also co-founder of The Family Adventure Project and a regular contributor to many online travel communities.

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